Empire roundup: Olympic sprint legend to honor area greats

THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

Extending gloved hands skyward in racial protest, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos stare downward during the playing of the Star Spangled Banner after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City on Oct. 16, 1968. Australian silver medalist Peter Norman is at left. (AP Photo)

Extending gloved hands skyward in racial protest, U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos stare downward during the playing of the Star Spangled Banner after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City on Oct. 16, 1968. Australian silver medalist Peter Norman is at left. (AP Photo)

Olympic bronze medalist and activist John Carlos will, on Saturday night, honor 20 athletes who still hold track and field Empire records established 35 years ago or older.

Santa Rosa Junior College will host “Sprint for Justice: An Evening With Olympian John Carlos” 4 p.m. Saturday at the Bertolini Student Center, room 4608.

Tickets are $50. Parking is $4. A question and-answer session will be followed by Carlos signing his 2011 memoir: “The John Carlos Story.”

The lecture is being sponsored by the Black Student Union and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

Carlos placed third in the 200 meter race at the Mexico City Summer Games in 1968. Along with USA teammate Tommie Smith, who won the event, the pair raised a black-gloved fist in the air on the awards podium in silent protest of racism and economic injustice facing minorities in this country.

Among the track and field athletes Carlos will honor are Jerry Robinson, the former NFL linebacker who still holds the Cardinal Newman school record he established 38 years ago in the 100 meters (10.80), 200 meters (21.92) and the long jump (23 feet, 1.75 inches).

Mel Gray holds the oldest records in the Empire. Before he went on to star in the NFL as a kick returner and wide receiver, Gray was a Montgomery Viking who ran a 10.34 100 meters, a 20.64 200 meters and leapt 25 feet, three-quarter inch in the long jump. All three marks are not only school records but All-Empire records as well and were set 48 years ago.

Carlos will give each athlete a framed, autographed poster.

BOGUE AN ALTERNATE

Tim Bogue of Windsor earned a spot as an alternate for sectional qualifying for the U.S. Open national golf championship tournament.

Bogue shot a 1-under-par 71 Wednesday at the Half Moon Bay Golf Links in Half Moon Bay. Sectional qualifying will take place June 3 at 13 sites worldwide, 11 of them in the United States.

Bogue was in a six-way tie at 71, a shot behind overall leader Joshua Granger. Bogue and the others played a sudden-death playoff to fill the remain four slots. He bogeyed the second playoff hole and dropped to alternate status.

He was one of four Sonoma County golfers competing in the local qualifying tournament. Also playing but failing to qualify were were Santa Rosa residents Steve Strong, Alexander Reno and Montgomery High School golfer Nick Rogers.

SRJC will host “Sprint for Justice: An Evening With Olympian John Carlos” 4 p.m. Saturday at the Bertolini Student Center, room 4608.
Tickets are $50. Parking is $4. An question and-answer session will be followed by Carlos signing his 2011 memoir: “The John Carlos Story.”
Carlos was the bronze medalist in the 200 meters at the 1968 Summer Olympics who stood on the awards platform with a raised black-gloved fist, a silent protest of racism and economic disadvantage to African — Americans.
The lecture is being sponsored by the Black Student Union and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

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